Oliver Sipple

One morning, Oliver Sipple went out for a walk. A couple hours later, to his own surprise, he saved the life of the President of the United States. But in the days that followed, Sipple’s split-second act of heroism turned into a rationale for making his personal life into political opportunity. What happens next makes us wonder what a moment, or a movement, or a whole society can demand of one person. And how much is too much?

Radiolab

 

The Primitive Streak

the-primitive-streakLast May, two research groups announced a breakthrough: they each grew human embryos, in the lab, longer than ever before. In doing so, they witnessed a period of human development no one had ever seen. But in the process, they crashed up against something called the ’14-day rule,’ a guideline set over 30 years ago that dictates what we do, and possibly how we feel, about human embryos in the lab.
This piece was produced by Molly Webster and Annie McEwen, with help from Matt Kielty.

Radiolab | 23rd September 2016

Eye in the Sky

eye-in-the-skyIn 2004, when casualties in Iraq were rising due to roadside bombs, Ross McNutt and his team came up with an idea. With a small plane and a 44 mega-pixel camera, they figured out how to watch an entire city all at once, all day long. Whenever a bomb detonated, they could zoom onto that spot and then, because this eye in the sky had been there all along, they could scroll back in time and see – literally see – who planted it. After the war, Ross McNutt retired from the Air Force, and brought this technology back home with him. Should we use it?
Produced by Andy Mills. Guests: Alex Goldmark and Manoush Zomorodi

Radiolab | 12th September 2016

Seneca, Nebraska

seneca-nebraska-1Back in 2014 the town of Seneca, Nebraska was deeply divided. How divided? They were so fed up with each other that some citizens began circulating a petition that proposed a radical solution. If a majority wanted to they’d self-destruct, end the town and wipe their community off the map.
Producer Simon Adler goes to Seneca to knock on doors and sit down with residents for a series of kitchen table conversations. What happened in this tiny town and what its fracture says about America?
Produced and Reported by Simon Adler.

Radiolab | 12th October 2016